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Alterations of Macromolecule Biosynthesis after Chronic Administration of Opiates and Ethanol

  • Horace H. Loh
  • Nancy M. Lee
  • R. Adron Harris
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 85B)

Abstract

The literature concerning the effects of opiates, alcohol and barbiturates on RNA and protein metabolism is reviewed. Recent findings from this laboratory suggest that chronic morphine treatment increases the template activity of chromatin from oligodendroglial nuclei while chronic ethanol treatment decreases this activity. In addition, chronic morphine treatment stimulates protein synthesis in cell free systems and may increase the synthesis of discrete synaptic membrane proteins. Results from other laboratories suggest a general decrease in macromolecule biosynthesis with long term ethanol consumption. These results are discussed in terms of the possible roles of protein synthesis in the effects of chronic opiate and ethanol administration.

Keywords

Chronic Ethanol Physical Dependence Morphine Treatment Orotic Acid Chronic Morphine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Horace H. Loh
    • 1
  • Nancy M. Lee
    • 1
  • R. Adron Harris
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacology and Langley Porter Neuropsychiatric InstituteUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA

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