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Alcohol and Interpersonal Aggression

  • Richard E. Boyatzis
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 85B)

Abstract

The genesis of alcohol-related interpersonal aggression has been attributed to many factors. Various approaches have contended that such behavior is one of society’s children (a result of socio-economic pressures), or that interpersonal aggression is the result of biochemical processes of the organism which are affected by ethanol, or that acts of aggression when drinking are committed by sociopaths who would act aggressively whether drinking or not. Ideas which contributed to these approaches have appeared in written history as far back as the Code of Hammurabi and the Bible (Mandelbaum, 1965), popular literature (such as Shakespeare and current fiction), the literature of the Temperance Movement (Stewart, 1888; Chenery, 1889), as well as from research literature on human behavior and the effects of alcohol consumption. All of these approaches have shared the assumption that the causal relationship of events leading to alcohol-related interpersonal aggression emanates from one aspect of human functioning.

Keywords

Alcohol Consumption Aggressive Behavior Aversive Stimulus Blood Alcohol Concentration Drinking Pattern 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard E. Boyatzis
    • 1
  1. 1.McBer and Company BostonUSA

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