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Interpersonal Dysfunction

Chapter

Abstract

It is a well-known truism that humans are “social animals.” Social interactions are the hub of our existence, mediating work, leisure, the securing of food and shelter, and reproduction. The absence of quality interactions can have devastating consequences, ranging from retardation and autism in early infancy to the profound pattern of “institutionalization” found in many long-term residents of psychiatric hospitals. Consequently, it should not be surprising that social behavior has been a subject of great interest throughout history. Philosophers, theologians, and literary figures have long speculated on how and why people interact. More recently, social behavior has become a subject of scientific scrutiny. Social psychologists, linguists, sociologists, and anthropologists, among others, have devoted enormous energy to describing and understanding the rules, the content, and the structure of social encounters.

Keywords

Social Skill Skill Training Behavioral Assessment Social Skill Training Skill Deficit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Medical College of Pennsylvania at EPPIPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Clinical Psychology CenterUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA

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