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Adult Medical Disorders

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Abstract

Behavior, at long last, may be taking its proper place in Western medicine. The study of behavior in medicine has even spawned a new discipline, sometimes called behavioral medicine. In the broadest sense, behavioral medicine refers to the application of behavioral science knowledge and techniques to the understanding of physical health and illness and to prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation. In this chapter, we discuss behavioral medicine only in terms of the application of behavioral therapy and applied analysis to these same areas. An astonishing number of studies have been published in this area, mostly in the past 10 years, and the numbers are increasing exponentially.

Keywords

Irritable Bowel Syndrome Behavioral Medicine Migraine Headache Psychosomatic Medicine Apply Behavior Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryStanford University Medical CenterStanfordUSA

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