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Depression

Chapter

Abstract

The behavioral study of depression has reached its adolescence. As recently as 5 years ago, Becker (1974) observed that the behaviorists had relatively little to say about depression. The first behaviorally oriented single-case studies began to appear in the literature only some 10 years ago (e.g., Burgess, 1969; Johansson, Lewinsohn, & Flippo, 1969; Lazarus, 1968). It was not until 1973 that the first group-design studies appeared in the literature (McLean, Ogston, & Grauer, 1973; Shipley & Fazio, 1973). Thus, the systematic investigation of depression within a behavioral framework is a very recent phenomenon. Since 1973, at least 42 outcome studies of behavioral treatments of depression have been reported, and several major reviews have appeared (e.g., Blaney, 1979; Craighead, 1979; Hollon, 1979; Parloff, Wolfe, Hadley, & Was- kow, 1978; Rehm & Kornblith, 1979; Rush & Beck, 1978). In a short period of time, both the scope and the number of behavioral studies of depression have increased dramatically. Stimulated by the increasing evidence that a variety of structured behavioral and cognitive therapies are effective in ameliorating depression, this prolific activity has resulted in an increased acceptance of such approaches among clinicians.

Keywords

Cognitive Therapy Irrational Belief Attributional Style Aversive Event Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentUniversity of OregonEugeneUSA

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