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Behavior Analysis Procedures in Classroom Teaching

Chapter

Abstract

Behavioral research conducted in classroom settings has analyzed behaviors contributing to the maintenance of order in the classrooms as well as behaviors involved in the actual learning of academic concepts. The procedures used to change these behaviors include those involving the manipulation of consequent stimuli and those involving the manipulation of antecedent stimuli. These delineations of procedures and behaviors provide essentially four general categories into which classroom behavioral research can be meaningfully divided: (1) research analyzing the effects of contingent relationships on the behaviors involved in maintaining order in the classroom: (2) research analyzing the effects of discriminative order in the Classroom: (3) research analyzing the effects of contingent relationships on the amount and correctness of work produced by the children in the classroom; and (4) research analyzing the effects of manipulating teachers’ instructions and discriminative stimulus materials on children’s learning academic concepts and skills.

Keywords

Disruptive Behavior Discriminative Stimulus Classroom Teaching Behavior Analysis Apply Behavior Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Human DevelopmentUniversity of KansasLawrenceUSA

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