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The Modification of Child Behavior Problems in the Home

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Abstract

The problems created by children’s troublesome behavior at home constitute one of the most serious sources of difficulty in our society. Children’s problems may lead to dissatisfaction, to distress, or even to violence (Bell, 1979) among family members. Since its inception, the field of behavior modification has addressed children’s home-based behavioral problems. Many problem areas have been addressed, from temper tantrums and other noxious social behaviors, to health-related behaviors, social skills, and many others. As the scope of the problems addressed broadens, new and effective treatment methods are being developed and research methodology is becoming more precise.

Keywords

Behavior Therapy Child Behavior Apply Behavior Analysis Nocturnal Enuresis Parent Training Manual 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MassachusettsAmherstUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyMansfield Training SchoolMansfield DepotUSA

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