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Professor Hunt, Meet Professor Whitehead

  • Paul Swartz
Chapter
  • 86 Downloads
Part of the Annals of Theoretical Psychology book series (AOTP, volume 4)

Abstract

Few recent developments in theoretical psychology refresh me with the same sense of portent I find in Harry Hunt´s massive reexamination of cognitive activity. His premises are faultless. Until the subject-object rift is healed and until we acknowledge the duality of human experience, consciousness will continue to yield to reductionist modeling. And because models, translated into social policy, may create the design they purport, more is at stake in this matter than the fortunes of an academic discipline. Man is adaptable and not merely in the routines that mark his immediately measurable behavior. If consciousness can be raised, it also can be lowered; if it can expand, it also can contract. It is not necessary to agree with Julian Jaynes that man was once bicameral to entertain the possibility that he might become so through applied, socalled cognitive science. And why not? It is but a short step from regarding consciousness as epiphenomenal to construing it as noise. Why not eliminate the noise and make the personal and social systems more efficient?

Keywords

Heat Sensation Sense Object Actual Occasion Perceptual Constancy Concrete Stimulus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Rollins, H. E. (Ed.). (1958). The letters of John Keats, 1814–1821 (Vol. 1). Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Swartz, P. (1985). Sea space and transcendent encounter. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 60, 715–722.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Whitehead, A. N. (1967). Science and the modern world. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Swartz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada

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