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Breaking the Objectivist Stranglehold on Personality Psychology

  • Tod S. Sloan
Chapter
  • 86 Downloads
Part of the Annals of Theoretical Psychology book series (AOTP, volume 4)

Abstract

Critiques of hypothetical-deductive models of explanation and their fellow travelers in psychology (objectivism, positivism, naturalism) are abundant these days. Vollmer’s article finds itself in the good company of critiques launched from other vantage points: phenomenology, hermeneutics, critical theory, and psychoanalysis, to name a few. The mainstream of personality psychology, however, continues to do its business undaunted, as if it were unconvinced of the devastating implications of these critiques for their entire enterprise.

Keywords

Critical Theory Trait dispOSitions Personality Psychology Fellow Traveler Critical Sociology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tod S. Sloan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of TulsaTulsaUSA

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