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Phosphocreatine as an Energy Store and Energy Shuttle in Human Skeletal Muscles

  • D. Matisone
  • J. Skards
  • A. Paeglitis
  • V. Dzerve
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Abstract

The metabolic rate of skeletal muscles during maximal voluntary static contractions can be increased more than 120-fold above the basal rate (5). Phosphocreatine (PCr) in the skeletal muscles serves as an energy (ATP) store at the onset of muscle contraction, the breakdown of which increases the rate of oxidative phosphorylation and stimulates anaerobic glycolysis (1,2). However, little is known about the integration of aerobic and anaerobic pathways of metabolism in skeletal muscles during contraction and ischemia. The aim of this study was to determine the role of PCr in forearm skeletal muscle energetics in two different situations: during voluntary static contractions with different relative forces of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and in resting skeletal muscles following forearm arterial occlusion (AO) of different durations.

Keywords

Maximal Voluntary Contraction Human Skeletal Muscle Arterial Occlusion Anaerobic Glycolysis Tension Time 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Matisone
    • 1
  • J. Skards
    • 1
  • A. Paeglitis
    • 1
  • V. Dzerve
    • 1
  1. 1.Latvia Institute of CardiologyRigaLatvia

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