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Regional Cerebral Blood Flow after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (SAH) in the RAT

  • Edwin M. Nemoto
  • W. Andrew Kofke
  • Howard Yonas
  • Donald Williams
  • Marie Rose
  • Gutti Rao
  • Elena Simplaceanau
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 411)

Abstract

Current models of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in the rat involve either the direct injection of blood into the subarachnoid space1,2 or arterial rupture after craniotomy.3,4 Neither model simulates the phenomenon occurring in patients; the first, because it lacks an arterial rupture, and the second because of the need to open the cranium and thereby eliminating the acute and precipitous rise in ICP and a component of the ischemic insult that occurs after a SAH. Recently, a model involving the intravascular rupture of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) by a suture passed via the common carotid artery into the internal carotid artery to puncture the MCA has been described5,6 which appears ideal because it duplicates the phenomenon in patients with respect to an arterial rupture, no craniotomy thereby allowing the rise in intracranial pressure to occur after rupture as it does in patients. Although changes in rCBF both qualitative and quantitative have been described for up to 2 hr after rupture, the changes occurring days after the hemorrhage to determine whether a delayed ischemic event occurs has not been determined. The objective of this study was to evaluate the changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) beyond days 1 and 3 postinsult.

Keywords

Middle Cerebral Artery Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Common Carotid Artery Cerebral Vasospasm Regional Cerebral Blood Flow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edwin M. Nemoto
    • 1
  • W. Andrew Kofke
    • 1
  • Howard Yonas
    • 1
  • Donald Williams
    • 1
  • Marie Rose
    • 1
  • Gutti Rao
    • 1
  • Elena Simplaceanau
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Anesthesiology/CCM, Neurological Surgery, and PathologyUniversity of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, NMR Center, Carnegie Mellon UniversityUSA

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