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Supply Contracts with Quantity Commitments and Stochastic Demand

  • Ravi Anupindi
  • Yehuda Bassok
Part of the International Series in Operations Research & Management Science book series (ISOR, volume 17)

Abstract

Supply chain management deals with the management of material, information, and financial flows in a network consisting of vendors, manufacturers, distributors and customers. Managing flows in this network is a major challenge due to the complexity (in space and time) of the network, the proliferation of products (often with short life cycles) that flow through this network, and the presence of multiple decision makers who each own and operate a piece of this network and optimize a private objective function. Supply chain management clearly involves a variety of issues including product/process design, production, third party logistics and outsourcing, supplier contracting, incentives and performance measures, multi-location inventory coordination, etc.

Keywords

Order Quantity Discount Price Supply Contract Bullwhip Effect Periodical Commitment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ravi Anupindi
    • 1
  • Yehuda Bassok
    • 2
  1. 1.J.L. Kellogg Graduate School of ManagementNorthwestern UniversityEvanstonUSA
  2. 2.School of Business AdministrationUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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