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Bottom-Up Vs. Top-Down Approaches to Supply Chain Modeling

  • Jeremy F. Shapiro
Part of the International Series in Operations Research & Management Science book series (ISOR, volume 17)

Abstract

The term “supply chain management” crystallizes concepts about integrated planning proposed by operations research practitioners, logistics experts, and strategists over the past 40 years (e.g., Hanssman (1959), LaLonde et al (1970), Porter (1985)). Integrated planning refers to functional coordination within the firm, between the firm and its suppliers, and between the firm and its customers. It also refers to intertemporal coordination of supply chain decisions as they relate to the firm’s operational, tactical and strategic plans.

Keywords

Supply Chain Supply Chain Management Product Family Enterprise Resource Planning Enterprise Resource Planning System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeremy F. Shapiro
    • 1
  1. 1.Sloan School of ManagementMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA

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