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Rheumaderm pp 271-277 | Cite as

The Treatment of Systemic Sclerosis

  • C. M. Black
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 455)

Abstract

Systemic Sclerosis, which is a complex heterogeneous connective tissue disorder, is treatable, although not curable. There are now available therapies which can offer partial relief, control end organ damage and improve quality of life for the scleroderma patient
  1. 1.

    The interplay between the vascular damage, the immune dysfunction and fibrosis, is complex.

     
  2. 2.

    The disorder contains subsets and its extent, severity and rate of progression is highly variable. Therapy must, therefore, be tailored to the individual patient systems involved.

     
  3. 3.

    There is, in some patients, regression of the disease after a few years or spontaneous stabilisation.

     
  4. 4.

    There is paucity of both clinical and laboratory features for ascertaining improvement or deterioration in the disease, especially with respect to visceral change.

     

Keywords

Pulmonary Hypertension Interstitial Lung Disease Systemic Sclerosis Primary Pulmonary Hypertension Skin Sclerosis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. M. Black
    • 1
  1. 1.Academic Unit of RheumatologyRoyal Free Hospital School of MedicineLondonUK

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