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Chemicals from Roots, Hairy Roots, and Their Application

  • B. Canto-Canché
  • V. M. Loyola-Vargas
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 464)

Abstract

Plants produce thousands of different compounds through the secondary metabolism pathways. Since many of these products are obtained by direct extraction from plants that are cultivated in the field or some times even collected in their original habitat several factors can alter their yield. The use of plant cell cultures has overcome several inconveniences for the production of secondary metabolites. Organized cultures, and especially root cultures, can make a significant contribution to our understanding of secondary metabolism. Furthermore, a new alternative has arisen: transformed root cultures. Until now, hairy roots have been obtained from more than 100 different species. The products that they are able to produce range from alkaloids to aromatic compounds and dyes. These kinds of cultures have turned out to be an invaluable tool to study the biochemistry and the gene expression of the metabolic pathways in order to elucidate the intermediaries and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites.

Keywords

Hairy Root Root Culture Hairy Root Culture Panax Ginseng Secondary Metabolite Production 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Canto-Canché
    • 1
  • V. M. Loyola-Vargas
    • 1
  1. 1.Centro de Investigación Científica de YucatánUnidad de Biología ExperimentalCordemex, YucatánMéxico

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