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The Impact of HIV Infection on Psychological Functioning and Quality of Life

  • Lena Nilsson Schönnesson
  • Michael W. Ross
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Part of the AIDS Prevention and Mental Health book series (APMH)

Abstract

The HIV-related physical, social, and sexual threats, as well as psychological issues discussed in previous chapters, represent profound threats to the individual’s psychological well-being and quality of life. The threats and issues are stressful in that they are undesirable and involve psychological. change, “for good or ill, or by return to the psychological status quo ante”1 (p. 3). It should be remembered though that stress vulnerability might oscillate over time but also be selective; for example, an individual. may be affected by sexual threats but less so by social threats.

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Social Support Life Satisfaction Psychological Distress Psychological Functioning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lena Nilsson Schönnesson
    • 1
  • Michael W. Ross
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Social WorkUniversity of GothenburgGothenburgSweden
  2. 2.WHO Center for Health Promotion Research and Development School of Public HealthUniversity of Texas, Houston Health Science CenterHoustonUSA

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