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Impact of the Euro on Members and Non-Members

  • Jeffrey A. Frankel
Chapter

Abstract

It may be late in the game to debate the merits of EMU for its members. But I begin with a review of the pros and cons. The UK, Sweden and others have yet to decide whether to join, so for them the evaluation is still relevant. The second half of these notes will turn to the implications of the euro as a new international currency. Impacts on countries outside EMU are discussed in addition to countries inside.

Keywords

Exchange Rate Monetary Policy Central Bank Current Account Deficit Reserve Currency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey A. Frankel

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