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Basic Concepts: Perspectives in Elasticity Theory

  • S. I. Krishnamachari
Chapter
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Abstract

The common use of the term stress analysis includes any kind of structural analysis. In the field of thermoplastics design, there is a growing awareness of the importance of stress analysis. In recent years, structural plastics have been used for applications in load-bearing structural components in the automotive, aerospace, sporting goods, and construction industries. Hence, design engineers are increasingly concerned about stress-related problems, typically with the strength, stiffness, and life expectancy of their products. About twenty years ago, these problems were primarily associated with the metallic components.

Keywords

Shear Stress Normal Stress Shear Strain Principal Stress Stress Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. I. Krishnamachari
    • 1
  1. 1.L.J. Broutman & Associates, Ltd.ChicagoUSA

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