Advertisement

FcεRI Mediates IgE-Binding to Human Epidermal Langerhans Cells

  • Oliver Kilgus
  • Binghe Wang
  • Armin Rieger
  • Birgit Osterhoff
  • Dieter Maurer
  • Dagmar Födinger
  • Georg Stingl
  • Jean-Pierre Kinet
  • Kenichi Ochiai
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 329)

Abstract

In 1986, it was first recognized that epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) in lesional and non-lesional skin of atopic dermatitis (AD) patients have IgE-binding capacity (1,2). Furthermore, it was shown that, after acid-stripping of cell-bound IgE, the anti-IgE reactivity of LC can be restored by incubation of tissue substrates with native, but not with heated autologous IgE-rich serum (1). In view of the heat lability of the Fc∊ fragment, this observation led to the concept that IgE binds to LC via its Fc∊ fragment (1). Since exposure of LC-enriched epidermal cells from non-atopies to IL-4 and/or IFN-γ leads to the surface expression of anti-FceRII/CD23-reactive moieties on LC (3), it was originally thought that LC in AD skin bind IgE via FcεRII/CD23 induced by cytokines present in the AD skin microenvironment. However, IgE+ LC were subsequently also detected in other diseases, provided that the serum IgE level exceeded 100kU/L (4). It was therefore reasonable to assume that the presence of IgE-binding sites on human epidermal LC is not a consequence of the respective disease process, but rather represents a constitutive property of these cells.

Keywords

Mast Cell Atopic Dermatitis Atopic Dermatitis Skin Haemopoietic Growth Factor Vienna Medical School 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Bruynzeel-Koomen C, Van Wichen DF, Toonstra J, Berrens L, Bruynzeel PLB: The presence of IgE molecules on epidermal Langerhans cells in patients with atopic dermatitis. Arch Dermatol Res 278: 199–205, 1986PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bruynzeel-Koomen C, Van der Donk EMM, Bruynzeel PLB, Capron M, De Gast GC, Mudde GC: Associated expression of CD1 antigen and Fc receptor for IgE on epidermal Langerhans cells from patients with atopic dermatitis. Clin Exp Immunol 74: 137–142, 1988PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Bieber T, Rieger A, Neuchrist C, Prinz JC, Rieber EP, Boltz-Nitulescu G, Scheiner O, Kraft D, Ring J, Stingl G: Induction of Fc∊R2/CD23 on human epidermal Langerhans cells by human recombinant interleukin 4 and γ interferon. J Exp med 170: 309–314, 1989PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Bieber T, Braun-Falco O: IgE-bearing Langerhans cells are not specific to atopic eczema but are found in inflammatory skin diseases. J Amer Acad Dermatol 24: 658–659, 1991CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Wang B, Rieger A, Kilgus O, Ochiai K, Maurer D, Födinger D, Kinet JP, Stingl G: Epidermal Langerhans cells from normal human skin bind monomeric IgE via Fc∊RI. J Exp Med 175: 1353–1365, 1992PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Metzger H, Alcaraz G, Hohman R, Kinet JP, Pribluda V, Quarto R: The receptor with affinity for immunoglobulin E. Ann Rev Immunol 4: 419–470, 1986CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Ravetch JV, Kinet JP: Fc receptors. Ann Rev Immunol 9: 457–492, 1991CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Spiegelberg HL: Structure and function of Fc receptors for IgE on lymphocytes, monocytes and macrophages. Adv Immunol 35: 61–88, 1984PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Kikutani H, Inui S, Sato R, Barsumian EL, Owaki H, Yamasaki K, Kaisho T, Uchibayashi N, Hardy RR, Hirano T, Tsunasawa S, Sakiyama F, Suemura M, Kishimoto T: Molecular structure of human lymphocyte receptor for immunoglobulin E. Cell 47: 657–665, 1986PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Robertson MW, Albrandt K, Keller D, Liu FT: Human IgE-binding protein: a soluble lectin exhibiting a highly conserved interspecies sequence and differential recognition of IgE glycoforms. Biochemistry 29: 8093–8100, 1990PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Chisei R, Jouvin MHE, Kinet JP: Complete structure of the mouse mast cell receptor for IgE (Fc∊RI) and surface expression of chimeric receptors (rat-mouse-human) on transfected cells. J Biol Chem 264: 15323–15327, 1989Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Bieber T, de la Salle H, Wollenberg A, Hakimi J, Chizzonite R, Ring J, Hanau D, de la Salle C: Human epidermal Langerhans cells express the high affinity receptor for Immunoglobulin E. J Exp Med 175, 1282–1290 , 1992CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Parker CW: Lipid mediators produced through the lipoxygenase pathway. Ann Rev Immunol 5: 65–84, 1987CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Plaut M, Pierce JH, Watson CJ, Hanley-Hyde J, Nordan RP, Paul WE: Mast cell lines produce lymphokines in response to cross-linkage of FcεRI or to calcium ionophores. Nature 339: 64–67, 1989PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Wodnar-Filipowicz A, Heusser CH, Moroni C: Production of the haemopoietic growth factors GM-CSF and interleukin-3 by mast cells in response to IgE receptor mediated activation. Nature 339: 150–152, 1989PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Burd PR, Rogers HW, Gordon JR, Martin CA, Jayaraman S, Wilson SD, Dvorak AM, Galli SJ, Dorf ME: Interleukin 3-dependent and-independent mast cells stimulated with IgE and antigen express multiple cytokines. J Exp Med 170: 245–257, 1989PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Mudde GC, Van Reijsen FC, Boland GJ, De Gast GC, Bruijnzeel PLB, Bruijnzeel-Koomen CAFM: Allergen presentation by epidermal Langerhans cells from patients with atopic dermatitis is mediated by IgE. Immunology 69: 335–341, 1990PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Oliver Kilgus
    • 1
  • Binghe Wang
    • 1
  • Armin Rieger
    • 1
  • Birgit Osterhoff
    • 1
  • Dieter Maurer
    • 1
  • Dagmar Födinger
    • 1
  • Georg Stingl
    • 1
  • Jean-Pierre Kinet
    • 2
  • Kenichi Ochiai
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Dermatology I, Division of Cutaneous ImmunobiologyUniversity of Vienna Medical SchoolViennaAustria
  2. 2.Molecular Allergy and Immunology SectionNational Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of HealthRockvilleUSA

Personalised recommendations