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Human in Vitro T Cell Sensitization Using Hapten-Modified Epidermal Langerhans Cells

  • Corinne Moulon
  • Josette Péguet-Navarro
  • Daniel Schmitt
  • Pascal Courtellemont
  • Gérard Redziniak
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 329)

Abstract

Epidermal Langerhans cells (LC), a population of non-lymphoid dendritic cells which constitutively express MHC class II molecules, have been demonstrated to play a key role in the development of contact hypersensitivity reactions by picking up the haptens within epidermis and migrating to draining lymph nodes where antigen presentation to specific T cells occursl. Recent studies reported that after 2-3 day in vitro incubation, LC undergo profound phenotypic changes and acquire an interdigitating cell appearance2,3. In the murine system, at least in some strains of mice, the incubated LC become substantially more potent accessory cells than fresh LC, while they are relatively inefficient in processing of protein antigens4. It has been thus suggested that cultured LC may represent the in vitro counterparts of antigen-bearing LC that have migrated to regional lymph nodes5.

Keywords

Antigen Present Cell Trinitrobenzenesulfonic Acid Potent Antigen Present Cell Autologous Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Antigen Present Cell Function 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Corinne Moulon
    • 1
  • Josette Péguet-Navarro
    • 1
  • Daniel Schmitt
    • 1
  • Pascal Courtellemont
    • 2
  • Gérard Redziniak
    • 2
  1. 1.INSERM U 346, Hôpital E. HerriotFrance
  2. 2.Centre de Recherches PCDSaint-Jean de BrayeFrance

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