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Ultrastructure of Interdigitating Cells in the Rat Thymus During Cyclosporin A Treatment

  • Eric J. de Waal
  • Henk-Jan Schuurman
  • Louk H. P. M. Rademakers
  • Henk van Loveren
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 329)

Abstract

Cyclosporin A (CsA) is well-known for its immunosuppressive characteristics. 1 A peculiar activity ascribed to the compound is the induction of auto-immune phenomena resembling graft-versus-host disease. This emerges in rodents after a short-course CsA treatment during the recovery phase after lethal irradiation and syngeneic bone marrow transplantation. 2 A role for the thymus has been implicated in this so-called syngeneic graft-versus-host disease. 3 Histology of the thymus after CsA treatment shows the almost absence of medullary areas. 4,5 The normal medulla is characterized by the presence of medium-sized lymphocytes with the medullary T-cell immunophenotype, and by the microenvironment consisting of medulla-type epithelium and interdigitating cells (IDC). Besides some small remnants, these components of the medulla are lacking in animals after a two-week period of CsA treatment. The disappearance of medullary epithelium and IDC has been related to a disturbance of negative selection of lymphocytes, resulting in the export of potentially autoreactive cells, that give auto-immune phenomena in the periphery.

Keywords

Daily Subcutaneous Injection Normal Thymus Birbeck Granule Medullary Area Interdigitating Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric J. de Waal
    • 1
  • Henk-Jan Schuurman
    • 1
    • 2
  • Louk H. P. M. Rademakers
    • 2
  • Henk van Loveren
    • 2
  1. 1.National Institute of Public Health and Environmental ProtectionBA BilthovenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Departments of Pathology and Internal MedicineUniversity HospitalGA UtrechtThe Netherlands

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