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Rat Thymic Dendritic Cells

  • Ed W. A. Kamperdijk
  • Joanne M. S. Arkema
  • Marina A. M. Verdaasdonk
  • Robert H. J. Beelen
  • Ellen van Vugt
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 329)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare rat thymic dendritic cells in situ (i. e. interdigitating cells, IDC) with isolated dendritic cells (1) using enzyme cytochemical, immunocytochemical and electron-microscopical methods. Moreover the phenotypical and morphological changes of these isolated dendritic cells were studied after culture. To get more information about the influence of size (volume) and/or micro-environment on antigen presentation, we also compared the capacity to present GT to primed T cells by freshly isolated dendritic cells from thymus, spleen and peritoneal cavity.

Keywords

Dendritic Cell Phagocytic Activity Birbeck Granule Interdigitating Cell Cytocentrifuge Preparation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ed W. A. Kamperdijk
    • 1
  • Joanne M. S. Arkema
    • 1
  • Marina A. M. Verdaasdonk
    • 1
  • Robert H. J. Beelen
    • 1
  • Ellen van Vugt
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. Cell Biology, Medical FacultyVrije UniversiteitBT AmsterdamThe Netherlands

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