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Actin pp 183-189 | Cite as

Actin Filaments and the Spatial Positioning of mRNAS

  • Gary J. Bassell
  • Krishan L. Taneja
  • Edward H. Kislauskis
  • Cindi L. Sundell
  • Christine M. Powers
  • Anthony Ross
  • Robert H. Singer
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 358)

Abstract

Filamentous actin has been shown to play a major role in the control of mRNA expression. Previous work emphasized RNA-cytoskeletal interactions using biochemical fractionation. More recently, in situ hybridization at the light microscopic and ultrastructural levels has shown that actin, in particular, is directly associated with mRNAs. It is proposed that these interactions play a major regulatory role in how the mRNA is spatially sequestered within the cytoplasm and provide a mechanism for its regulation (Singer, 1992).

Keywords

Actin Filament Cytoplasmic Compartment Actin mRNA Actin Isoforms Cell BioI 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary J. Bassell
    • 1
  • Krishan L. Taneja
    • 1
  • Edward H. Kislauskis
    • 1
  • Cindi L. Sundell
    • 1
  • Christine M. Powers
    • 1
  • Anthony Ross
    • 1
  • Robert H. Singer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Cell BiologyUniversity of Massachusetts Medical SchoolWorcesterUSA

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