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The Role of MRI Volumetric Studies in The Investigation of Patients with Intractable Epilepsy

  • F. Cendes
  • F. Andermann
  • P. Gloor
  • A. Olivier
  • A. Evans
  • T. Peters
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 264)

Abstract

The assessment of intractable epilepsy has traditionally depended on analysis of clinical seizure patterns in association with a searching EEG investigation. EEG recording of seizures is still considered necessary for seizure localisation prior to surgical treatment in patients without an obvious lesion on MRI. Radiological and neuropsychological studies are also essential for pre-surgical investigation. When the findings are not completely congruous, or when there are seeming contradictions in surface and sphenoidal recordings, monitoring with surgically implanted depth electrodes may be required. However, there is a significant risk of morbidity associated with the implantation of depth electrodes. This, together with the limited availability and high costs of the procedure, reduces the number of patients who can benefit from surgical treatment.

Keywords

Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Hippocampal Volume Hippocampal Sclerosis Intractable Epilepsy Febrile Convulsion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Cendes
    • 1
  • F. Andermann
    • 1
  • P. Gloor
    • 1
  • A. Olivier
    • 1
  • A. Evans
    • 1
  • T. Peters
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurology and NeurosurgeryMcGill University and the Montreal Neurological Hospital and InstituteMontrealCanada

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