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Thermal Stability and the Suppression of Convection in a Rotating Fluid on Earth

  • William A. Arnold
  • Liya L. Regel
Chapter

Abstract

Thermal stability in a rotating fluid on earth is examined. Thermal stability refers here to the fluid state where convection is absent or at a minimum even in the presence of thermally induced density gradients. We examine the conditions which bring about thermal stability in a rotating fluid on earth through numerical simulations. It is shown that at least one thermal field exists for a rotating fluid with a gravitational background field where convection does not occur. The numerical model used is three-dimensional.

Keywords

Rayleigh Number Rotation Rate Directional Solidification Coriolis Force Rotation Vector 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • William A. Arnold
    • 1
  • Liya L. Regel
    • 1
  1. 1.International Center for Gravity Materials Science and ApplicationsClarkson UniversityPotsdamUSA

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