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Dietary Fat Effects on Animal Models of Breast Cancer

  • William T. CaveJr.
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 364)

Abstract

Carcinogenesis is a multistage process which is frequently influenced by environmental factors. Elements in our nutritional environment have been repeatedly identified as important influences in the final expression of many human cancers. In this regard, both epidemiologi-cal studies and laboratory investigations have indicated that high fat diets enhance the growth and development of breast cancer. The biochemical mechanisms responsible for this dietary effect remain obscure at present, but the potential benefits of better understanding this important relationship are well recognized. Since epidemiology has a limited capability for defining such complex biochemical events, animal tumors have become the main experimental models for study.

Keywords

Mammary Tumor Dietary Lipid Mammary Tumor Cell Mammary Tumorigenesis Mammary Tumor Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • William T. CaveJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Endocrine Unit, Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of Rochester Medical CenterRochesterUSA

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