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Studies on Xanthan Structure by Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy

  • Michael Wilkins
  • Martyn C. Davies
  • David E. Jackson
  • Clive J. Roberts
  • Saul J. B. Tendler
  • John R. Mitchell
  • Sandra E. Hill

Abstract

Scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) is a technique for the direct 3D imaging of surface atoms, molecules and biomolecular shapes. The use of the equipment for the imaging of polysaccharides is still in its infancy and techniques have to be established that allow critical evaluation of the images produced by STM. Images of the microbial polysaccharide xanthan using preparation techniques applicable to both the STM and electron microscopy (EM) have been produced, thus enabling comparison of the two techniques.

Keywords

Scan Tunnelling Microscopy Scan Tunnelling Microscopy Image Highly Orient Pyrolytic Graphite Microbial Polysaccharide Xanthan Solution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Stokke, B.T. and Elgsaeter, A., 1991, Electron microscopy of carbohydrate polymers, Advances in Carbohydrate Analysis. 1:195–247.Google Scholar
  2. Williams, P. M., Davies, M. C., Jackson, D. E., Roberts J. C., Tendler, S. J. B. and Wilkins, M. J., 1992, Biological applications of scanning tunnelling microscopy: novel software algorithms for the display, manipulation and interpretation of STM data, Nanotechnology 2:172–181.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Wilkins
    • 1
  • Martyn C. Davies
    • 1
  • David E. Jackson
    • 1
  • Clive J. Roberts
    • 1
  • Saul J. B. Tendler
    • 1
  • John R. Mitchell
    • 1
  • Sandra E. Hill
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Pharmaceutical Sciences and ABFSUniversity of NottinghamNottinghamUK

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