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Abstract

Seizures may be defined as paroxysmal events of cerebral origin (Dodrill, 1981) or as “the clinical manifestation of an abnormal and excessive discharge of a set of neurons of the brain” (Hauser et al., 1991, p. 429). Generalized seizures involve the entire brain and are bilaterally symmetrical and without focal onset. Partial seizures are of focal onset. Consciousness is not impaired in simple seizures, but is impaired in complex seizures. Idiopathic seizures, in contrast to symptomatic seizures, occur in the absence of historical insult to the brain (Hauser et al., 1991). If a seizure lasts 30 min or more, the patient is said to be in status epilepticus (Uthman & Wilder, 1989). The classification schemata for seizures are further elaborated in three papers by the Commission on Classification and Terminology of the International League Against Epilepsy (1981, 1985, 1989).

Keywords

Status Epilepticus Partial Seizure Epileptic Patient Absence Seizure Partial Epilepsy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert M. AndersonJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.HonoluluUSA

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