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Speech and Language

  • Robert M. AndersonJr.
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

The speech/language area of cognitive functioning can be broken down into several subar-eas—fluency, repetition, naming, auditory comprehension, oral reading, reading comprehension, writing, and spelling. Verbal fluency is production of an uninterrupted, flowing series of speech sounds. Prosody is the rhythmic intonation or melody of speech. Word fluency is production of words representative of a category (e.g., animals, foods, words that begin with the letter “S”). Repetition is oral reproduction of patterns of speech sounds from auditory presentation. Paraphasias are word substitutions in speech. In a literal or phonemic parapha-sia, syllables are substituted (“pell” for “bell”). In a verbal or semantic paraphasia, an unintended word is substituted (Goodglass & Kaplan, 1983). Naming is the ability to produce appropriate names for things. Impaired naming is termed anomia. Auditory comprehension is the ability to understand spoken language. Oral reading is the ability to read aloud. Reading comprehension is the ability to read and understand written material. Impaired reading comprehension is called alexia. Impairment in writing is termed agraphia. Impairments may occur in any of these areas of language functioning.

Keywords

Response Modality Presentation Modality Oral Reading Nonsense Word Verbal Comprehension 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert M. AndersonJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.HonoluluUSA

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