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Regional Population Differences and Population Pharmacokinetics of Steroidal Contraceptives

  • Sang Guo-wei
Chapter
Part of the Reproductive Biology book series (RBIO)

Abstract

Clinical pharmacokinetics of contraceptive steroids is a challenging discipline with a strong theoretical framework for application to the development of steroidal contraceptives and delivery systems for fertility regulation. Pharmacokinetic parameters of contraceptives are of critical importance in assessing contraceptive efficacy, side-effects and menstrual bleeding patterns which are relevant to acceptability and continuation rates.

Keywords

Pharmacokinetic Parameter Chinese Woman Population Pharmacokinetic Intraindividual Variability Mexican Woman 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sang Guo-wei
    • 1
  1. 1.Family Planning Research InstituteZhejiang Academy of Medical SciencesHangzhou, ZhejiangChina

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