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Abstract

The diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa, according to the fourth revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) (American Psychiatric Association, 1993), are summarized as follows: (1) refusal to maintain a body weight over a minimally normal weight for age and height (e.g., weight loss leading to maintenance of a body weight less than 85% of that expected, or failure to make expected weight gain during period of growth, leading to body weight less than 85% of that expected); (2) intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat, even though underweight; (3) disturbance in the way that body weight, size, or shape is experienced; and (4) amenorrhea in females (absence of at least 3 menstrual cycles). The new DSM-IV criteria formalize earlier overlapping conventions for subtyping anorexia nervosa into restricting and binge eating/purging types based on the presence or absence of the bingeing and/or purging (i.e., self-induced vomiting, or the misuse of laxatives, or diuretics). This is consistent with recent research favoring purging over bingeing as the marker for defining anorexia nervosa subtypes(Garner, Garner & Rosen, 1993 It is important to note that patients move between these two subtypes with chronicity leading toward aggregation in the binge eating/purging subgroup (Hsu, 1988).

Keywords

Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorder Binge Eating Bulimia Nervosa Binge Eating Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • David M. Garner
    • 1
  • Lionel W. Rosen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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