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BIONNIC: An Efficient and Flexible Integrator for Biological Neural Network Simulators

  • E. K. Blumt
  • Q. Li
  • S. C. J. Hyland
  • P. Leung
  • X. Wangt
Conference paper

Abstract

We present a stable and efficient integrator, BIONNIC, for computing solutions to large systems of ordinary differential equations obtained from compartmental modeling of networks of neurons, each neuron having an arbitrarily branched tree structure. BIONNIC is a portable and reusable library of C-subroutines which differs from many general purpose integrators (LSODE, IVPAG) by permitting multiple calls for different sets of equations to be intermixed, and by dynamically allocating memory. This allows for easy and efficient implementation of parallel simulation of biological neural networks. In addition to fixed time step modes, BIONNIC has variable step, variable order (VSVO) backward differentiation formulae (BDF), which are stiffly stable for orders 1 to 6, combined with an O (n) algorithm for solving systems of linear equations.

Keywords

Large Time Step Biological Neural Network Backward Differentiation Formula Flexible Integrator Reusable Library 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. K. Blumt
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Q. Li
    • 1
  • S. C. J. Hyland
    • 2
  • P. Leung
    • 3
  • X. Wangt
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MathematicsLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Department of Computer ScienceLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Department of Biomedical EngineeringLos AngelesUSA

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