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Abstract

For more than 2000 years connective tissues and products extracted from them have been used in the home and in the food industry for their gelling properties, and also as technical products in the form of adhesives. Availability and product consistency improved when industrial-scale gelatin manufacture appeared at the end of the nineteenth century. More recently, an improved knowledge of amino acids and proteins in general, and of collagen and gelatin in particular, together with the introduction of modern production techniques, has made it possible to produce gelatin which is bacteriologically safe and in accordance with international standards and rigid specifications.

Keywords

Gelling Agent Gelatin Solution Hydrolyse Gelatin Invert Sugar Wine Fining 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Poppe

There are no affiliations available

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