Enzymes as diagnostic tools

  • P. D. Patel

Abstract

As shown throughout this book, enzymes, as functional ingredients either in partially purified form or as components of whole systems, have been used over the years in many areas of food processing such as yoghurt preparation, beer fermentation and pickling purposes. The full potential of these remarkable reagents has not yet been realised and, even at present, new uses are found for the existing enzymes and other enzymes from a variety of matrices are constantly being discovered. A significant proportion of enzymes are used both commercially and in small-scale research and development purposes for a wide range of applications, including stereospecific bio-conversions, upgrading raw materials and treatment of waste products into more beneficial end-products or environmentally safe substitutes. Indeed, it can be said that all biological processes, intracellular and extracellular, would be highly inefficient unless the processes were controlled and maintained by a vast array of enzymes working in harmony with other components of the overall system including endocrinological agents, receptors and ionic constituents.

Keywords

Starch Polysaccharide Folate Chitin Lysozyme 

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