Savoury flavours — an overview

  • D. G. Land

Abstract

Savoury flavour is defined as far as possible and discussed with examples of savoury foods. It is characterized as much by its complexity of taste, odour and trigeminally mediated attributes as by its combination of stimulation by mouth with lack of sweetness. The major sources of savoury flavour, originating from various food components are discussed in outline but not in terms of detailed chemistry. Factors that influence release of savoury flavour stimulating substances are then discussed, while attention is drawn to the lack of research resource in these areas, and the consequential empirical nature of savoury flavouring.

Keywords

Sugar Hydrolysis Fermentation Sulphide Common Salt 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1994

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  • D. G. Land

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