Flexible assembly and packaging automation in food production — study tour report

  • A. Dore
  • J. M. Sharp

Abstract

This chapter presents the observations made whilst carrying out a SERC ACME Directorate funded study tour of Australia, Canada, Europe, New Zealand, Japan and the United States. The areas of food manufacture and flexible handling, assembly and packaging provided the main technical focus of the visits.

Keywords

Cholesterol Toxicity Dioxide Microwave Welding 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Dore
  • J. M. Sharp

There are no affiliations available

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