Fish and Fish Products

  • M. J. Urch

Abstract

These are small fatty fish of the pelagic class (q.v.). Unlike most other fish species, anchovies are not normally eaten fresh, but are marketed in a preserved form such as salted, canned, smoked or dried. When cured with salt in barrels and left in the sun in warm climates (e.g. in Spain and North West Africa), they undergo a complicated process of maturation, possibly involving fat oxidation, which results in the characteristic flavour.

Keywords

Sulphide Mercury Europe Adenosine Histamine 

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Further Reading

  1. Hall, G.M. (1992) (ed.) Fish Processing Technology, Blackie,Glasgow.Google Scholar
  2. Hardy, R.W. (1992) Fish Processing By-products and their Reclamation,in Pearson, A.M. and Dutson, T.R. (eds) Inedible Meat By-Products, Elsevier Applied Science, Barking.Google Scholar
  3. Lanier, T.C. and Lee, C.M. (1992) (eds) Surimi Technology, Marcel Dekker, New York.Google Scholar
  4. Piggott, G.M. and Tucker, B.W. (1991) Seafood: Effects of Technology on Nutrition, Marcel Dekker, New York.Google Scholar
  5. Regenstein, J.M. and Regenstein, C.E. (1991).An Introduction to Fish Science and Technology, Van Nostrand Reinhold, NewYork.Google Scholar
  6. Sea Fish Authority and Torry Research Station (1984) Specification for the Purchase of Fish, Sea Fish Authority, Hull.Google Scholar
  7. Sikorski, Z.E. (1990) (ed.) Seafood: Resources. Nutritional Comosition and Preservation, Wolfe Publishing, London.Google Scholar
  8. Vinogradov, A.P. (1953) The Elementary Chemical Composition of Marine Organisms, Yale University Press, New Haven.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. J. Urch

There are no affiliations available

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