Quality Requirements in the Modern Poultry Industry

  • B. Erdtsieck

Abstract

There is much misunderstanding about quality. People disagree on what it is and how it can be achieved. Although everyone is in favour of it, it remains elusive. One of the misunderstandings is that quality is thought of as excellence, e.g. a French ‘Label Rouge’ chicken is considered to be a quality product, whereas the normal broiler is not. However, quality is not necessarily equated with an expensive luxury item (Skulberg, 1986).

Keywords

Hydrogen Peroxide Microwave Transportation Income Marketing 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Erdtsieck
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.ApeldoornThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Formerly of the Spelderholt Centre for Poultry Research and ExtensionBeekbergenThe Netherlands

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