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Pesticide Use and Food Safety

  • R. Brian How

Abstract

Surveys by the Food Marketing Institute, Vance Publishing Co., and Kansas State University, among others, have found that many consumers have become concerned about food safety. Their concern extends beyond the occurrence of natural components such as sodium or saturated fats to the presence of pesticide residues, additives, or contaminants. Fresh fruits and vegetables have come under particularly close scrutiny because of the chemicals used to control pests such as harmful insects, plant diseases, and noxious weeds. The problem is intensifying because of the emergence of new pests and of strains resistant to existing chemicals, while the development and testing of new control measures that meet safety standards is becoming more difficult and expensive. Concern is also growing about other effects of chemical pesticide use such as groundwater contamination and hazardous working conditions on farms.

Keywords

Food Safety Pesticide Residue Fresh Fruit Market Environment Acceptable Daily Intake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Brian How
    • 1
  1. 1.Cornell UniversityUSA

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