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Narrow-Band Hybrid Pulsed Laser/EMAT System for Non-Contact Ultrasonic Inspection Using Angled Shear Waves

  • Douglas A. Oursler
  • James W. Wagner
Chapter

Abstract

Conventional ultrasonic testing (UT) using angled shear waves to locate and size potentially critical cracks and flaws in power generation and refinery equipment has become a widely utilized industrial tool. Because this technique uses piezoelectric transducers it requires intimate surface contact and fluid couplants. Therefore, conventional UT has the important drawback that it is difficult to use on surfaces at elevated temperature and, as a result, may require costly plant shut downs to implement. The development of non-contact techniques for angled shear wave UT would represent a significant improvement in the ability to test hot vessels and pipes.

Keywords

Rayleigh Wave Pulse Train Physical Acoustics Ultrasonic Testing Single Laser Pulse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas A. Oursler
    • 1
  • James W. Wagner
    • 1
  1. 1.Center For Nondestructive EvaluationThe Johns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA

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