Advertisement

Quantitative Aspects of the Use of Succinylcholine in the Classification of Muscle Spindle Afferents

  • A. Taylor
  • R. Durbaba
  • J. F. Rodgers

Summary

Testing with succinylcholine (SCh) has been shown to give valuable information about the nature of the contacts of muscle spindle afferents on the three different intrafusal muscle fibre types. The important features of the methods to be used in order to allow quantitative interpretation of the test are reviewed. From large populations of gastrocnemius and jaw muscle afferents in the cat it was concluded that only two measurements of the ramp and hold stretch responses were needed to detect significant endings on bag1 and bag2 fibres. These were the increments in dynamic stretch response and in initial frequency caused by the SCh. Evidence is reviewed to support the view that essentially all the effects of SCh, under the dosage conditions used, are due to contraction of the bag fibres. The resulting predictions regarding patterns of afferent terminations on intrafusal fibres are compared with the conclusions from independent histological observations. From studies of jaw muscle afferents it is concluded that the SCh classification can give new insights into factors which influence central connectivity patterns.

Keywords

Conduction Velocity Muscle Spindle Primary Afferents Dynamic Index Intrafusal Fibre 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Banks, R. W., Barker, D. and Stacey, M. J. (1982). Form and distribution of sensory terminals in cat hindlimb muscle spindles. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. 99, 329–364CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Banks, R. W., Ellaway, P. H. and Scott, J. J. (1980). Responses of de-efferented muscle spindles of peroneus brevis and tertius muscles in the cat. Journal of Physiology 310, 53PGoogle Scholar
  3. Cooper, S. (1961). The responses of the primary and secondary endings with intact motor innervation during applied stretch. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Physiology. 46, 389–392Google Scholar
  4. Dutia, M. B. and Ferrell, W. R. (1980). The effect of suxamethonium on the response to stretch of Golgi tendon organs in the cat. Journal of Physiology. 306, 511–518PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Fowle, A. J., Taylor, A., Rodgers, J. F. and Durbaba, R. (1992). Mesencephalic and diencephalic areas for fusimotor control in the anaesthetised cat. Journal of Physiology 446, 230PGoogle Scholar
  6. Gladden, M. H. (1976). Structural features relative to the function of intrafusal muscle fibres in the cat. Progress in Brain Research. 44, 51–59PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Matthews, P. B. C. (1963). The response of de-efferented muscle spindle receptors to stretching at different velocities. Journal of Physiology. 168, 660–678PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Ovalle, W. K. and Smith, R. S. (1972). Histochemical identification of three types of intrafusal muscle fibres in the cat and monkey based on the myosin ATPase reaction. Canadian Journal of Physiological and Pharmacological Sciences 50, 195–202CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Price, R. F. and Dutia, M. B. (1987). Properties of cat neck muscle spindle afferents and their excitation by succinylcholine. Experimental Brain Research. 68, 619–630Google Scholar
  10. Price, R. F. and Dutia, M. B. (1989). Physiological properties of tandem muscle spindles in neck and hind-limb muscles. Progress in Brain Research. 80, 47–56PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Prochazka, A. and Somjen, G. G. (1986). Insensitivity of cat muscle spindles to hyperkalaemia in the physiological range. Journal of Physiology. 372, 26PGoogle Scholar
  12. Rack, P. M. H. and Westbury, D. R. (1966). The effects of suxamethonium and acetylcholine on the behaviour of cat muscle spindles during dynamic stretching and during fusimotor stimulation. Journal of Physiology. 186, 698–713PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. Rodgers, J. F., Durbaba, R., Fowle, A. J. and Taylor, A. (1993). Flexor and extensor muscle fusimotor activation from midbrain stimulation in the anaesthetized cat. Journal of Physiology. 459, 462PGoogle Scholar
  14. Rodgers, J. F., Fowle, A. J., Durbaba, R. and Taylor, A. (1993). Sine versus ramp stretches for characterising fusimotor actions on muscle spindles in the anaesthetized cat. Journal of Physiology 467, 298PGoogle Scholar
  15. Rodgers, J. F., Taylor, A., Durbaba, R. and Fowle, A. J. (1992). The value of dynamic index in assessing muscle spindle afferent properties in the anaesthetized cat. Journal of Physiology 446, 22PGoogle Scholar
  16. Rodgers, J. F., Taylor, A., Fowle, A. J. and Durbaba, R. (1992). Differences in the time course of effects of succinylcholine on different muscle spindle afferent types in the anaesthetized cat. Journal of Physiology. 446, 565PGoogle Scholar
  17. Rodgers, J. F., Taylor, A., Fowle, A. J. and Durbaba, R. (1993). The occlusion of Ia muscle spindle afferent dynamic sensitivity by bag2 activation in the anaesthetized cat. Journal of Physiology 459, 218PGoogle Scholar
  18. Sciote, J. J. (1993). Fibre type distribution in the muscle spindles of the cat jaw-elevator muscles. Archives of Oral Biology 38, 685–688PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Taylor, A., Durbaba, R. and Rodgers, J. F. (1992). The classification of afferents from muscle spindles of the jaw-closing muscles of the cat. Journal of Physiology 456, 609–628PubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. Taylor, A., Durbaba, R. and Rodgers, J. F. (1993). Projection of cat jaw muscle spindle afferents related to intrafusal fibre influence. Journal of Physiology 465, 647–660PubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. Taylor, A., Durbaba, R. and Rodgers, J. F. (1994). The site of action of succinylcholine on muscle spindle afferents in the anaesthetised cat. Journal of Physiology 476, 26PGoogle Scholar
  22. Taylor, A., Durbaba, R., Rodgers, J. F. and Fowle, A. J. (1993). Reciprocal actions of midbrain stimulation on static and dynamic fusimotor neurones of the hindlimb in anaesthetised cats. Journal of Physiology 473, 15PGoogle Scholar
  23. Taylor, A., Morgan, D. L., Gregory, J. E. and Proske, U. (1993). The mode of action of succinycholine on secondary muscle spindle endings of soleus in the anaesthetized cat. Journal of Physiology 459, 217PGoogle Scholar
  24. Taylor, A., Rodgers, J. F., Fowle, A. J. and Durbaba, R. (1992). Conduction velocity and bag1 influence on gastrocnemius muscle spindle afferents in the anaesthetized cat. Journal of Physiology 446, 21PGoogle Scholar
  25. Taylor, A., Rodgers, J. F., Fowle, A. J. and Durbaba, R. (1992). The effect of succinylcholine on cat gastrocnemius muscle spindle afferents of different type. Journal of Physiology. 456, 629–644PubMedGoogle Scholar
  26. Taylor, A., Rodgers, J. F., Fowle, A. J. and Durbaba, R. (1992). Some problems in the interpretation of spindle afferent recordings. In Muscle Afferents and Spinal Control of Movement., ed. Jami, L., Pierrot-Deseilligny, E. and Zytnicki, D., pp 105–111. Pergamon Press Ltd., OxfordGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Taylor
    • 1
  • R. Durbaba
    • 1
  • J. F. Rodgers
    • 1
  1. 1.Sherrington School of PhysiologyUMDS, St. Thomas’ Hospital CampusLondonUK

Personalised recommendations