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Functional CD40 Antigen on B Cells, Dendritic Cells and Fibroblasts

  • J. Banchereau
  • B. Dubois
  • J. Fayette
  • N. Burdin
  • F. Brière
  • P. Miossec
  • M.-C. Rissoan
  • C. van Kooten
  • C. Caux
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 378)

Abstract

During antigen specific immune responses, antigen specific naive B cells undergo a cascade of events including activation, expansion, mutations, isotype switch, selections and differentiation into either antibody secreting plasma cells or memory B cells. These antigendependent events occur in different areas of secondary lymphoid organs, as well as other non-lymphoid organs. It requires the interaction of B cells with antigens and numerous cell types including T cells, dendritic cells (DC) and follicular dendritic cells (FDC). These cells interact with B cells through different cell surface molecules and through the release of polypeptidic mediators called cytokines.

Keywords

Dendritic Cell Follicular Dendritic Cell Secondary Lymphoid Organ Antigen Specific Immune Response CD40 Ligation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Banchereau
    • 1
  • B. Dubois
    • 1
  • J. Fayette
    • 1
  • N. Burdin
    • 1
  • F. Brière
    • 1
  • P. Miossec
    • 1
  • M.-C. Rissoan
    • 1
  • C. van Kooten
    • 1
  • C. Caux
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory for Immunological ResearchSchering-PloughDardillyFrance

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