Migration of Interleukin-6 Producing Langerhans Cells to Draining Lymph Nodes following Skin Sensitization

  • Marie Cumberbatch
  • Jayne C. Hope
  • Rebecca J. Dearman
  • Stephen J. Hopkins
  • Ian Kimber
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 378)

Abstract

Epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) have potential to develop into active antigen presenting cells for T cell-dependent immune responses. It is likely that the accessory function of these cells is dependent not only on their ability to express certain costimulatory adhesion molecules such as B71, but also on their capacity to elaborate cytokines2,3. LC and/or the dendritic cells (DC) into which they mature, were considered originally not to produce cytokines. However, it is now known that cultured LC, which are in many ways analogous to the immunocompetent LC which have migrated to draining lymph nodes following skin sensitization, have the ability to synthesize and secrete interleukins 1ß and 6 (IL-ß and IL-6) in vitro 4. The production by LC of IL-lß and IL-6 is of interest as both cytokines are known to be important accessory molecules for T cell activation5 and may therefore participate in LC/T lymphocyte interactions during antigen presentation in vivo. Certainly, LC-derived IL-1ß has been reported recently to be essential for the induction of primary immune responses following skin sensitization of BALB/c mice6. Evidence that IL-6 may also be important, comes from studies in mice where the induction phase of skin sensitization was found to be associated closely with the production by draining lymph node cells of IL-67. Although T lymphocytes have the capacity to produce IL-6, proliferating T cells were found not to be the major source of this cytokine in allergen-activated lymph nodes. We chose to examine whether the DC which accumulate in draining lymph nodes following skin sensitization, and the epidermal LC from which they derive, express this cytokine.

Keywords

Migration Biotin Toxicology Isopentane Oxazolone 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    F.W. Symington, W. Brady, and P.S. Linsley, Expression and function of B7 on human epidermal Langerhans cells. J. Immunol. 150 : 1286 (1993).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    A.H. Enk and S.I. Katz, Early molecular events in the induction phase of contact sensitivity.Proc. natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 89 : 1398 (1992).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    C. Heufler, G. Topar, F. Koch, B. Trockenbacher, E. Kampgen, N. Romani and G. Schuler, Cytokine gene expression in murine epidermal cell suspensions : Interleukin 1ß and macrophage inflammatory protein la are selectively expressed in Langerhans cells but are differentially regulated in culture. J. Exp. Med. 176 : 1221 (1992).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    S. Schreiber, O. Kilgus, E. Payer, R. Kutil, A. Elbe, C. Mueller and G. Stingl, Cytokine pattern of Langerhans cells isolated from murine epidermal cell cultures. J. Immunol. 149 : 3525 (1992).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    F.A. Houssiau, P.G. Coulie and J. Van Snick, Distinct roles of IL-1 and IL-6 in human T cell activation. J. Immunol. 143 : 2520 (1989).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    A.H. Enk, V.L. Angeloni, M.C. Udey and S.I. Katz, An essential role for Langerhans cell-derived IL-lß in the initiation of primary immune responses in skin. J. Immunol. 150 : 3698 (1993).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    J.C. Hope, R.J. Dearman, R.J. Debicki, I. Kimber and S.J. Hopkins, Interleukin 6 production by draining lymph node cells following primary contact sensitization of mice : Relationship to the proliferative response. Int. Arch. Allergy. Immunol. 103 : 378 (1994).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    S.B. Mizel, The Interleukins, J. FASEB, 3 : 2379 (1989).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    M. Cumberbatch and I. Kimber, Phenotypic characteristics of antigen-bearing cells in the draining lymph nodes of contact sensitized mice. Immunology, 71 : 404 (1990).PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marie Cumberbatch
    • 1
  • Jayne C. Hope
    • 2
  • Rebecca J. Dearman
    • 1
  • Stephen J. Hopkins
    • 2
  • Ian Kimber
    • 1
  1. 1.Zeneca Central Toxicology LaboratoryMacclesfield, CheshireUK
  2. 2.University of Manchester Rheumatic Diseases CentreSalfordUK

Personalised recommendations