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Defects in the Function of Dendritic Cells in Murine Retroviral Infection

  • Dmitry I. Gabrilovich
  • Steven Pattterson
  • Jennifer J. Harvey
  • Greg M. Woods
  • William Elsley
  • Stella C. Knight
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 378)

Abstract

An inadequate immune response is one of the most important features of retroviral infections. Antigen presenting cells, in particular dendritic cells (DC), are a key element of the immune system, and assessment of their function in retroviral diseases may be very important in understanding of the pathogenesis of these infections. It has been established that DC are reservoir of HIV infection in the human body and can transmit the virus to T cells (1–3). However, the data about functional activity of DC in HIV infection are contradictory. Because of difficulties in obtaining purified DC from human lymph nodes we used in this study a murine retrovirus Rauscher leukemia virus (RLV) as an animal model of human retroviral diseases. This virus causes acute pathological effects (malignant erythrocytopoesis and splenomegaly associated with anaemia) which are rapidly lethal. Immunosuppressive effects in vitro and in vivo of RLV have been documented (4) earlier.

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Dendritic Cell Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type Infected Mouse Human Lymph Node 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dmitry I. Gabrilovich
    • 1
  • Steven Pattterson
    • 1
  • Jennifer J. Harvey
    • 1
  • Greg M. Woods
    • 2
  • William Elsley
    • 1
  • Stella C. Knight
    • 1
  1. 1.Antigen Presentation Research GroupSt. Mary’s Hospital Medical School at Northwick Park Institute for Medical ResearchHarrowUK
  2. 2.Department of PathologyUniversity of TasmaniaHobartAustralia

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