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Transforming Growth Factor Beta (TGFβ) Directs IgA1 and IgA2 Switching in Human Naive B Cells

  • Francine Briere
  • Thierry Defrance
  • Beatrice Vanbervliet
  • Jean-Michel Bridon
  • Isabelle Durand
  • Francoise Rousset
  • Jacques Banchereau
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 371)

Abstract

Until recently, there was no experimental system that permitted the study of soluble factors capable of inducing human B lymphocytes to switch isotypes in vitro. Unlike lipopolysaccharide which is currently used for murine B cells, most of human B cell activators are poorly efficient. However, two novel experimental procedures are now available: one is based on the capacity of activated T cells or their membranes to elicit a B cell response which involves interactions in surface molecules.1 The other one, which is referred to as the CD40 system was developed in our laboratory.2 In this “CD40 system”, polyclonal activation and sustained proliferation of human B cells3 are obtained by presentation of an anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody on an irradiated mouse fibroblastic L cell line that stably expresses CDw32 (FcγRII). Upon interaction with the CD40 molecule, the Fc portion of the antibody undergoes spatial rearrangement which allows high-affinity interaction with CDw32. One can further enhance the B cell response by coupling the anti-CD40 stimulation with surface Ig (slg) cross-linking agents such as anti-µ or S. aureus Cowan (SAC) particles (Fig. 1).

Keywords

Nerve Growth Factor Receptor Polyclonal Activation CD40 System Spatial Rearrangement Quadruplicate Determination 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francine Briere
    • 1
  • Thierry Defrance
    • 2
  • Beatrice Vanbervliet
    • 1
  • Jean-Michel Bridon
    • 1
  • Isabelle Durand
    • 1
  • Francoise Rousset
    • 1
  • Jacques Banchereau
    • 1
  1. 1.Schering-Plough, Laboratory for Immunological ResearchDardilly CedexFrance
  2. 2.Institut PasteurLyon Cedex 07France

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