Suppression of Single Spinal Motoneurones by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: Studies in Healthy Subjects, Multiple Sclerosis and Stroke

  • S. J. Boniface
  • K. R. Mills
  • M. Schubert

Abstract

Transcranial magnetic stimulation produces at least two peaks in firing probability in single human spinal motoneurones (Boniface, Mills & Schubert, 1991, Mills, Boniface & Schubert, 1992). These have latencies varying from 20 – 31 ms and 64 – 100 ms in the first dorsal interosseus muscle and have been termed the primary and secondary peaks, respectively. These events are also detectable in patients with motoneurone disease, multiple sclerosis and stroke (Mills, Boniface & Schubert, 1991, Schubert, Mills, Boniface, Konstanzer & Dengler, 1991), but often requiring higher stimulus intensities. The aim of this study was to determine whether or not periods of reduced firing probability of motor units were produced at stimulus intensities sub-threshold for an early excitatory response (primary peak) in health and disease. Findings have also been reported in full elsewhere (Boniface, Mills & Schubert, 1994).

Keywords

Neuropathy 

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References

  1. Boniface, S. J., Mills, K. R. & Schubert, M. (1991) Responses of single spinal motoneurones to magnetic brain stimulation in healthy subjects and patients with multiple sclerosis. Brain 114, 643–662.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Boniface S. J., Mills K. R. & Schubert, M. (1994). Suppression and long latency excitation of single spinal motoneurons by transcranial magnetic stimulation in health, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. Muscle Nerve 17, 642–646.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Mills, K. R., Boniface, S. J. & Schubert, M. (1991) The firing probability of single motor units following transcranial magnetic stimulation in healthy subjects and patients with neurological disease. In: Magnetic Motor Stimulation. Basic Principles and Practice. eds. Levy, W. J., Cracco, R. Q., Barker, A. T. & Rothwell, J. C.Google Scholar
  4. Mills, K. R., Boniface, S. J. & Schubert, M. (1992) Origin of the secondary increase in firing probability of human motoneurones following transcranial magnetic stimulation. Studies in healthy subjects, type I hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy and multiple sclerosis. Brain 114, 2451–2463.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Schubert, M., Mills, K. R., Boniface, S. J., Konstanzer, A. & Dengler, R. (1991) Changes in the response pattern of single motor units to transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with multiple sclerosis and stroke. Zeitschrift fur Elektroenzephalographie Elektromyographie und Verwandte Gebiete 22, 28–36.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. J. Boniface
    • 1
  • K. R. Mills
    • 1
  • M. Schubert
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Clinical NeurophysiologyRadcliffe InfirmaryOxfordUK
  2. 2.Neurologische UniversitaetsklinikBonnGermany

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