Health Effects of Tobacco

  • Richard Doll

Abstract

The health effects of tobacco depend on the way it is used. When chewed or taken as snuff it causes an increased risk of cancer in, respectively, the mouth and nose. When smoked, particularly in the form of cigarettes, the smoke is inhaled, absorbed into the blood, and distributed throughout the body, and so is able to cause disease in many different organs. That it does so is not surprising, when it is borne in mind that tobacco smoke contains some 4000 chemicals, including more than 50 that can cause cancer in animal experiments.

Keywords

Europe Pneumonia Tuberculosis Smoke Bronchitis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard Doll
    • 1
  1. 1.Imperial Cancer Research Fund Cancer Studies UnitRadcliffe InfirmaryUK

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