The Effects of Sodium Nitroprusside and L-Glutamate on the Regulation of the Cytoskeletal Associated Protein Tau in Primary Cultured Neurons from Rat

  • J. Chen
  • H. Wang
  • Y. Ying
  • L. Juarez
  • L. Binder
  • H. Ghanbari
  • F. Murad

Abstract

Some of the hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s Disease are the presence of paired helical filaments (PHF) associated with neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques in histological sections of brains of patients with Alzheimer’s Disease (1). Tau is a neuronal protein that associates with microtubules, i.e., microtubule associated protein or MAP (2). Tau promotes microtubule assembly and its phosphorylation may be important for axonal growth during development. However, hyperphosphorylated tau may polymerize and lead to aggregated forms that are associated with paired helical filaments (3). It is believed that hyperphosphorylated tau may participate in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s Disease and, perhaps, other neurodegenerative processes.

Keywords

Superoxide Nitrite NMDA Thiol HEPES 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Chen
    • 1
  • H. Wang
    • 1
  • Y. Ying
    • 1
  • L. Juarez
    • 1
  • L. Binder
    • 1
  • H. Ghanbari
    • 1
  • F. Murad
    • 1
  1. 1.Molecular Geriatrics CorporationLake BluffUSA

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