Defining Socially and Psychologically Desirable Body Weights and the Psychological Consequences of Weight Loss and Regain

  • David M. Garner
Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 278)

Abstract

Obesity is viewed as a common condition in the United States with an estimated prevalence of as high as 24% for men and 27% for women (Kuczmarski, 1992). The enormity of public concern about obesity is reflected by the estimated $55 billion to be spent annually in the United States by 1995 for weight loss products and services (Marketdata Enterprises, 1989). While the diet industry still commands enormous profits and professionally led weight control programs are the standard treatment offered to those presenting with obesity, there has been a growing wave of public discontentment with both commercial and professional programs over the past several years. This has been partially fueled by highly publicized Congressional and FTC hearings charging the commercial dieting industry with misleading and fraudulent advertising.

Keywords

Cholesterol Obesity Depression Triglyceride Defend 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • David M. Garner
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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