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Peptides from Rhodopsin Induce Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis in Lewis Rats

  • Grazyna Adamus
  • Henry Ortega
  • Lundy Campbell
  • Anatol Arendt
  • Paul A. Hargrave

Abstract

Experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) is an organ-specific, T cell mediated autoimmune disease, which is characterized by destruction of the photoreceptor cells of the retina. EAU serves as a model for human intraocular inflammatory diseases, like uveitis, which are major causes of visual impairment. The animal disease can be induced by immunization with certain retinal proteins. The antigens used in most studies for EAU induction have been S-antigen (arrestin) and interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein (IRBP)(Gery, Michizuki and Nussenblatt, 1986). We, and other investigators, have reported that rhodopsin is similarly uveitogenic in rats, guinea pigs, and in monkeys (Adamus, et al., 1992; Marak, et al., 1980; Meyers-Elliott and Sumner, 1982; Moticka and Adamus, 1991; Schalken, et al., 1988b; Schalken, et al., 1989; Wong, et. al., 1977). Rhodopsin is the major protein of photoreceptor cells and has a molecular weight of 40,000 daltons. It is the photoreceptor protein that initiates the visual transduction process (Hargrave and McDowell, 1993).

Keywords

Photoreceptor Cell Bovine Rhodopsin Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis Interphotoreceptor Retinoid Binding Protein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Grazyna Adamus
    • 1
  • Henry Ortega
    • 1
  • Lundy Campbell
    • 1
  • Anatol Arendt
    • 2
  • Paul A. Hargrave
    • 2
  1. 1.R. S. Dow Neurological Sciences InstitutePortlandUSA
  2. 2.Department of OphthalmologyUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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